Forever a blog.

Harry Potter. Legend of Zelda. Lord of the Rings. Musical theatre major. Atheist and freethinker. Mild socialist. Food snob. Native Northern Californian. Avid reader. What they'll probably put on my gravestone: "He recognized that being white, cis-gender, and straight gave him undue privilege, and he tried very hard not to be an asshat."

“And I’d urge you to look at… those people who tell you, at your age, that you’re dead till you believe as they do — what a terrible thing to be telling to children! And that you can only live by accepting an absolute authority — don’t think of that as a gift. Think of it as a poisoned chalice. Push it aside however tempting it is. Take the risk of thinking for yourself. Much more happiness, truth, beauty, and wisdom will come to you that way.”

—   

Christopher Hitchens (via theycallthisart)

And in honor of my 1600th post, the immeasurable wisdom of the late Christopher Hitchens. You are missed dearly. 

(via theycallthisart-deactivated2013)

I didn’t know it was possible to miss someone this much whom you never met.

Nevertheless, I feel sure that he would approve of my drinking to his memory. 

To Hitch.

“[P]lease do not trouble deaf heaven with your bootless cries. Unless, of course, it makes you feel better.”

—   

Christopher Hitchens, from the posthumously published Mortality.

What with all this talk about those poor people who were murdered today, it was inevitable that some people would want to pray for them and their families. It seems very appropriate that now, a year since Hitch has died, I’m reading this volume and lamenting the futility of prayer. I would that prayer could do some real, tangible good in this world. I wish it could be so. But it is not. 

Though I never enjoyed the privilege of meeting you, I miss you, Hitch. I’m thinking about you. You still inspire me. Thank you for everything. 

teachthemhowtothink:

divineirony:

An audience member asks Christoper Hitchens, “Why take something away that brings happiness and meaning to 95% or the American people and replace it with something that brings meaning to only 5% or the people?” Namely: religion.

Hitchslap ensues.

“Don’t bring the toys to my house.  Don’t say my children must play with these toys.  Don’t say ‘My toys are not allowed by their toys.’  I’m not going to have any of that.”

Oh Hitch… I miss you.  <3

I can’t believe this man has already been gone almost 8 months… I haven’t seen a new roasting worthy of the title “Hitchslap” since around the end of November, 2011. We all miss you, Hitch. 

(via teachthemhowtothink)

“Arguments that explain everything, explain nothing.”

—   

Christopher Hitchens, on the topic of God being invoked to explain everything.

(From Authors@Google. This quote appears around 31:30.)

atheismfuckyeah:

[By all means let an observant Jewish adult have his raw-cut penis placed in the mouth of a rabbi. (That would be legal, at least in New York.) By all means let grown women who distrust their clitoris or their labia have them sawn away by some other wretched adult female. By all means let Abraham offer to commit suicide to prove his devotion to the Lord or his belief in the voices he was hearing in his head. By all means let devour parents deny themselves the succor of medicine when in acute pain and distress. By all means - for all I care - let a priest sworn to celibacy be a promiscuous homosexual. By all means let a congregation that believes in whipping out the devil choose a new grown-up sinner each week and lash him until he or she bleeds. By all means let anyone who believes in creationism instruct his fellows during lunch breaks. But the conscription of the unprotected child for these purposes is something that even the most dedicated secularist can safely describe as a sin.]

Reblogging because Christopher Hitchens is fucking right. 

atheismfuckyeah:

[By all means let an observant Jewish adult have his raw-cut penis placed in the mouth of a rabbi. (That would be legal, at least in New York.) By all means let grown women who distrust their clitoris or their labia have them sawn away by some other wretched adult female. By all means let Abraham offer to commit suicide to prove his devotion to the Lord or his belief in the voices he was hearing in his head. By all means let devour parents deny themselves the succor of medicine when in acute pain and distress. By all means - for all I care - let a priest sworn to celibacy be a promiscuous homosexual. By all means let a congregation that believes in whipping out the devil choose a new grown-up sinner each week and lash him until he or she bleeds. By all means let anyone who believes in creationism instruct his fellows during lunch breaks. But the conscription of the unprotected child for these purposes is something that even the most dedicated secularist can safely describe as a sin.]

Reblogging because Christopher Hitchens is fucking right. 

And Stephen Fry’s eulogy of Christopher Hitchens

Almost as many words have been written about Christopher Hitchens since hedied as he would write in a typical working week. He was one of very, very few people on earth whom I would have missed just as much had I never had the pleasure and fortune of knowing him. He lit fires in people’s minds. He was an educator. He was polemical only inasmuch as he was naturally disputatious: this is a quality (ironically perhaps) that he might trace to the Talmudic influence of his Jewish genes as much as it being a brisk British parliamentarian style or a Hellenic mode of reasoning through argument. No one I have ever met or witnessed spoke better on the hoof. His writing was immaculate, subtle, crafted, filled with reference, knowledge, and reason. His humanist version of apostasy in turning against Clinton and in favor of the Iraq War enraged or puzzled some of his natural allies, but no honest human could confront his work and output without admiration. Of course there will be deranged people who will rejoice in their weird conviction of his eternal and infernal roasting. If hell has Christopher in it, then I’d like to reserve my place there now. But the joke is on the absurd religionists (who do not represent the majority of quietly devout and faithful people whom neither I nor Christopher wished to offend), for his words have made him immortal.

I can’t claim to call him friend with any kind of the depth and meaning that some can, but I can at least claim the privilege of having debated by his side, at Hay-on-Wye and here in London. And I can claim too that I call him “old horse,” like Stanley Ukridge, or “old crumpet,” like Barney Phipps and Oofy Prosser—for we shared a love and passion for P. G. Wodehouse and such things form a bond. Wodehouse, who adored the Pekingese breed of dog, liked to judge people on whether they were sound on Pekes. Evelyn Waugh, who like the Hitch and myself, revered the Master, judged people on how sound they are on Wodehouse. To paraphrase Lorenzo in The Merchant of Venice, “the man that hath no Wodehouse in him, nor is not moved with concord of sweet phrases, is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils; the motions of his spirit are dull as night, as his affections dark as Erebus. Let no such man be trusted.”

The first thing I want to disabuse you of is the notion that Christopher was all earnest purpose and humorless political and atheistical fervor.

Christopher Hitchenes

Brooks Kraft / Corbis

I go to this length on Wodehouse, because the first thing I want to disabuse you of is the notion that Christopher was all earnest purpose and humorless political and atheistical fervor. He fought for causes all his life, he stood up against bullies, he outraged those who assumed he was a natural ally, he poured OUT his energies in a thousand ways but always, always with wit, with panache, with a sumptuously exquisite use of language, with a deep understanding that the connection between style and substance is absolute. A true thing badly expressed becomes a lie. As a writer and speaker, his awesome command of English is a part of his greatness, it explains how he came to be something that Britain, or indeed America, can rarely boast of, and usually have little but contempt for—a public intellectual. The phrase makes one go a bit gooey with embarrassment, but Christopher opened up debate and gave voice to ideas and causes that without his talents would have been less ventilated and less understood.

This article came from here

Richard Dawkins’ beautiful eulogy of Christopher Hitchens

On 7 October, I recorded a long conversation with Christopher Hitchens in Houston, Texas, for the Christmas edition of New Statesman which I was guest-editing.

He looked frail, and his voice was no longer the familiar Richard Burton boom; but, though his body had clearly been diminished by the brutality of cancer, his mind and spirit had not. Just two months before his death, he was still shining his relentless light on uncomfortable truths, still speaking the unspeakable (“The way I put it is this: if you’re writing about the history of the 1930s and the rise of totalitarianism, you can take out the word ‘fascist’, if you want, for Italy, Portugal, Spain, Czechoslovakia and Austria and replace it with ‘extreme-right Catholic party’”), still leading the charge for human freedom and dignity (“The totalitarian, to me, is the enemy – the one that’s absolute, the one that wants control over the inside of your head, not just your actions and your taxes. And the origins of that are theocratic, obviously. The beginning of that is the idea that there is a supreme leader, or infallible pope, or a chief rabbi, or whatever, who can ventriloquise the divine and tell us what to do”) and still encouraging others to stand up fearlessly for truth and reason (“Stridency is the least you should muster … It’s the shame of your colleagues that they don’t form ranks and say, ‘Listen, we’re going to defend our colleagues from these appalling and obfuscating elements’.”).

The following day, I presented him with an award in my name at the Atheist Alliance International convention, and I can today derive a little comfort from having been able to tell him during the presentation that day how much he meant to those of us who shared his goals.

I told him that he was a man whose name would be joined, in the history of the atheist/secular movement, with those of Bertrand Russell, Robert Ingersoll, Thomas Paine, David Hume. What follows is based on my speech, now sadly turned into the past tense.

Christopher Hitchens was a writer and an orator with a matchless style, commanding a vocabulary and a range of literary and historical allusion far wider than anybody I know. He was a reader whose breadth of reading was simultaneously so deep and comprehensive as to deserve the slightly stuffy word “learned” – except that Christopher was the least stuffy learned person you could ever meet.

He was a debater who would kick the stuffing out of a hapless victim, yet did it with a grace that disarmed his opponent while simultaneously eviscerating him. He was emphatically not of the school that thinks the winner of a debate is he who shouts loudest. His opponents might have shouted and shrieked. Indeed they did. But Hitch didn’t need to shout, for he could rely instead on his words, his polymathic store of facts and allusions, his commanding generalship of the field of discourse, and the forked lightning of his wit.

Christopher Hitchens was known as a man of the left. But he was too complex a thinker to be placed on a single left-right dimension. He was a one-off: unclassifiable. He might be described as a contrarian except that he specifically and correctly disavowed the title. He was uniquely placed in his own multidimensional space. You never knew what he would say about anything until you heard him say it, and when he did, he would say it so well, and back it up so fully, that if you wanted to argue against him you had better be on your guard.

He was recognised throughout the world as a leading public intellectual of our time. He wrote many books and countless articles. He was an intrepid traveller and a war reporter of signal valour. But he had a special place in the affections of atheists and secularists as the leading intellect and scholar of our movement. A formidable adversary to the pretentious, the woolly-minded or the intellectually dishonest, he was a gently encouraging friend to the young, the diffident, and those tentatively feeling their way into the life of the freethinker and not certain where it would take them.

He inspired, energised and encouraged us. He had us cheering him on almost daily. He even begat a new word – the hitchslap. It wasn’t just his intellect we admired: it was also his pugnacity, his spirit, his refusal to countenance ignoble compromise, his forthrightness, his indomitable spirit, his brutal honesty.

And in the very way he looked his illness in the eye, he embodied one part of the case against religion. Leave it to the religious to mewl and whimper at the feet of an imaginary deity in their fear of death; leave it to them to spend their lives in denial of its reality. Hitch looked it squarely in the eye: not denying it, not giving in to it, but facing up to it squarely and honestly and with a courage that inspires us all.

Before his illness, it was as an erudite author, essayist and sparkling, devastating speaker that this valiant horseman led the charge against the follies and lies of religion. During his illness he added another weapon to his armoury and ours – perhaps the most formidable and powerful weapon of all: his very character became an outstanding and unmistakable symbol of the honesty and dignity of atheism, as well as of the worth and dignity of the human being when not debased by the infantile babblings of religion.

Every day of his declining life he demonstrated the falsehood of that most squalid of Christian lies: that there are no atheists in foxholes. Hitch was in a foxhole, and he dealt with it with a courage, an honesty and a dignity that any of us would be, and should be, proud to be able to muster. And in the process, he showed himself to be even more deserving of our admiration, respect, and love.

Farewell, great voice. Great voice of reason, of humanity, of humour. Great voice against cant, against hypocrisy, against obscurantism and pretension, against all tyrants including God.


This was the full article, and the source is the Belfast Telegraph. But because I give credit where it’s due, you can see the article here.

atheismfuckyeah:

‘Best of the Hitchslap’

Hitchslaps for the win. 

Excerpt from the debate “Is the Catholic church a force for good in the world?”

An unbelievable string of eloquent Hitchslaps. Checkmate.

(Source: atheismfuckyeah)

Why Hitchens and Orwell Matter

Disregard the title of this post; it’s nothing more than an allusion to a book by Hitchens about Orwell designed to garner your attention. I have created this post only to mention that I’ve noticed a very interesting link between these two men.

Christopher Hitchens was born April 13, 1949.

George Orwell’s dystopian novel, published in 1949, begins:

It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.

(Emphasis mine)

Now of course I don’t take this for any supernatural rubbish, but I regard it merely as one of those curious serendipitous things that amount to nothing more than a coincidence, but a telling one nonetheless. 

I feel it’s only natural that this coincidence should exist. I’m sure it was not unnoticed by Hitchens himself. 

“The noble title of ‘dissident’ must be earned rather than claimed; it connotes sacrifice and risk rather than mere disagreement.”

—   Christopher Hitchens (via atheismfuckyeah)

In Godless We Trust: Christopher Hitchens dies aged 62

atheismfuckyeah:

Celebrated journalist, writer and unshakeable secularist has died from complications of oesophageal cancer

The writer, journalist and contrarian Christopher Hitchens has died at the age of 62 after crossing the border into the “land of malady” on being diagnosed with an oesophageal…

A compilation video of Hitch's best bits, from Vanity Fair

atheismfuckyeah:

As you probably all know now, Christopher Hitchens passed away late last night due to complications of oesophageal cancer. He will be greatly missed - at least in this little patch of the woods - but he leaves behind a lot of good works. 

Vanity fair have put together this little compilation of his ‘best bits’, so I thought I would share. 

Enjoy, and maybe take as a lesson that you should try to live your life to the fullest and not regret a thing when your time comes.

(The Hitch would probably have rolled his eyes at that, but meh.)

~Mooglets